The values change every time the universe changes, and that’s every time we redefine a big enough bit of it. Which we do all the time through the process of discovery that isn’t discovery: just the invention of another version of how things are.

Bryan Boyer built an epaper display that shows movies at 24 frames per hour (instead than 24 frames/sec). He has called it Very Slow Movie Player (VSMP): it slows a movie down so that it can be experienced differently, so that its frames can be seen as paintings.

VSMP is an object that contains a Raspberry Pi computer, custom software, and a reflective ePaper display (similar to a Kindle), all housed inside a 3D printed case. Every 2.5 minutes a frame from the film stored on the computer’s memory card is extracted, converted to black and white using a dithering algorithm, and then communicated to the reflective ePaper display. […]

Films are vain creatures that typically demand a dark room, full attention, and eager eyeballs ready to accept light beamed from the screen or projector to your visual cortex. VSMP inverts all of that. It is impossible to “watch” in a traditional way because it’s too slow. In a staring contest with VSMP you will always lose. It can be noticed, glanced-at, or even inspected, but not watched.

Inspired by the project, Jon Bell built Slow In Translation: Lost in Translation, stretched out over the entire year as a webpage background.

In Bob Burrough’s words (Burrough is the author of the demo):

An environmentally-lit interface takes information from the environment around the device and uses it to render physically-accurate things on the screen. It appears as if the lights around you are shining on the things on the screen. […]

This doesn’t mean you have to hold a flashlight over your phone to read the web in bed. What it means is, designers are empowered to use the design language of the physical world to design their interfaces. Gloss, glitter, glow-in-the-dark, or any other visual quality may be used. In the case of reading a website in a darkened room, the web designer may apply elegant backlighting or glow-in-the-dark treatments to maintain legibility. This is far superior to today’s method of making your phone act like a spotlight that shines in your face.

I never used OpenDoc, but the idea behind it was interesting:

The core idea of OpenDoc is to create small, reusable components, responsible for a specific task, such as text editing, bitmap editing, or browsing an FTP server. OpenDoc provides a framework in which these components can run together, and a document format for storing the data created by each component. These documents can then be opened on other machines, where the OpenDoc frameworks substitute suitable components for each part, even if they are from different vendors.

Instead of recreating the same set of features within each app — forcing the user to learn different ways of doing the same thing —, the idea was to abstract the core functionality of each software to make it available across the OS.

I think iOS gets closer to that but it’s probably the internet, more than anything else, that which helped unbundling the data from the underlying software — turning the latter into a service.

Un documentario sulle persone dietro alle applicazioni, e la cura e dedizione che ci mettono. Qui c’è il trailer, mentre nel video in apertura Neven Mrgan di Panic parla di skeumorfismo.

Un documentario sul rapporto dell’uomo con tecnologia e natura. Di Tom Lowe, prodotto da Terrence Malick.

Il trailer di Everything, con narrazione di Alan Watts — Everything è un videogioco per PS4 senza un vero scopo, somiglia più a una simulazione che vi permette di assumere punti di vista diversi:

Playing Everything involves traveling through the Universe and seeing it from different points of view, it has elements of role playing games, sandbox & simulation. The systems connecting the game are designed to create moments of peace, beauty, sadness and joy — and allow the player to do whatever they want. Everything requires no player input — it will play automatically if left unattended.

(via @kottke)

Unicode ha approvato le emoji che faranno parte di Unicode 10, che dovrebbe arrivare verso metà anno.

Che orrore! Ma una cosa più down to earth ma realistica invece di un programma che letteralmente dice ‘gli sviluppatori sono le rockstar del momento’?

(Mi trova totalmente in disaccordo questa decisione di Apple di mettersi a produrre contenuti per Apple Music — in teoria, la trovo una distrazione, in pratica — visti i trailer dei primi risultati — direi che se ne faceva volentieri a meno. Sembra Sky.)

Qualcuno ha caricato su YouTube (partendo da un VHS) uno show del 1996 che insegna come accedere con il proprio computer a questo nuovo “internet” di cui si parla.

In this tutorial, we’ll take a look at the differences between The Internet and The World Wide Web, the differences between commercial OnLine Services such as the Microsoft Network, Prodigy, or America Online and the Internet, how to get connected to the Web, how to use something called a Web browser to navigate the Web, what a Web Page is, and how to search, locate, and download all types of files, from information files to video and audio files.

(via kottke)