Dave Winer:

S3 set the pattern for all the subsequent AWS services. And they’re delivered so many, filling almost all the niches you could imagine, sometimes with multiple products. But the one niche they have never attempted to fill is what Twitter does. Real-time Internet-scale notification with an easy to understand user interface. Turns out this is one of the big things that was missing from the Internet itself. […]

Because there is no web service that does what Twitter does, yet — it’s not too late for Twitter to open up another business model. I think it would totally kick ass. We need it. And I think they’d quickly forget that Twitter was ever going to be, exclusively, an advertising-based system.

Nel momento in cui Twitter ha ristretto le API è diventato meno interessante e promettente. C’è ancora tempo per invertire la rotta, invece di ridursi nell’ennesimo social network e alternativa a Facebook.

Daniel Jalkut, lo sviluppatore di MarsEdit, sulla nuova API di Medium:

One of the most unique aspects to Medium’s API is the provision for specifying a canonical URL and license on a post being submitted to the service. The canonical URL refers to another web location that should be considered the original, or most authoritative version of a post, while the license designates whether the post’s copyright terms stipulate a post is sharable as public domain or under a particular Creative Commons license. These attributes together indicate that Medium expects and encourages users of the API to contribute content that is not intended to be exclusive to Medium.

As a blogging enthusiast, I like the presence of these attributes because it implies support for a broad range of API client uses, and also because it acknowledges the value of diversity of web content. One of the criticisms of Medium over the past couple years has been the extent to which it encourages writers to abandon their own custom domain names in favor of a proprietary Medium.com based soapbox. These attributes encourage writers who favor their own canonical web sites to nonetheless engage in Medium’s network of readers, writers, and commenters.

È dunque possibile, per un articolo inviato a Medium tramite l’API, specificare fra i parametri dell’articolo l’indirizzo canonico a cui l’articolo risiede. Medium quindi riconosce e anzi incoraggia la ridistribuzione di contenuti che esistono principalmente e originalmente altrove — ponendosi come network di distribuzione.

Medium è un social network.