pointerSunspring: il cortometraggio scritto da un algoritmo

C’è Richard di Silicon Valley (Thomas Middleditch), è ambientato in un futuro non meglio definito, è un po’ bizzarro, confuso, e l’autore è un AI, “Benjamin“.

Si può guardarlo su Arstechnica, che scrive:

Benjamin is an LSTM recurrent neural network, a type of AI that is often used for text recognition. To train Benjamin, Goodwin fed the AI with a corpus of dozens of sci-fi screenplays he found online—mostly movies from the 1980s and 90s. Benjamin dissected them down to the letter, learning to predict which letters tended to follow each other and from there which words and phrases tended to occur together. The advantage of an LSTM algorithm over a Markov chain is that it can sample much longer strings of letters, so it’s better at predicting whole paragraphs rather than just a few words. It’s also good at generating original sentences rather than cutting and pasting sentences together from its corpus. Over time, Benjamin learned to imitate the structure of a screenplay, producing stage directions and well-formatted character lines. The only thing the AI couldn’t learn were proper names, because they aren’t used like other words and are very unpredictable. So Goodwin changed all character names in Benjamin’s screenplay corpus to single letters. That’s why the characters in Sunspring are named H, H2, and C. In fact, the original screenplay had two separate characters named H, which confused the humans so much that Sharp dubbed one of them H2 just for clarity.